When I first started to research for the Druids Pilgrimage, I had wanted the documentary to promote Druidry practises. In another sense, the documentary I created, also became a tourist film, promoting heritage and sites of natural beauty of Derbyshire.

Can a film have an impact on tourism?

Derbyshire isn’t exactly middle earth or Hobbiton, yet it does have some beautiful natural and heritage sites which genuinely need to be showcased. On the fourth day of filming, we had in mind to showcase some of these sites and drive tourism their way.

A Druids Pilgrimage – behind the scenes photographs taken by Ted Rokita and edited by Roland Keates.

Druids Pilgrimage is a pilgrimage of sites around Derbyshire which showcase, old relics of past industry, such as Magpie Mine, Rowtor Rocks, natural rock features on Stanton Moor, stone circles and the beautiful landscape on Harborough Rocks.

A Druids Pilgrimage – behind the scenes photographs taken by Ted Rokita and edited by Roland Keates. Natural rock features in Derbyshire.

Filming Locations

With my experience of owning and managing the Filming Location Detectives website several years ago, I came to understand that cinema fans enjoy visiting heritage sites precisely when they have been used as filming locations. A survey conducted by the Skift Tourist Information website shows that almost 10% of tourists choose their destinations according to the locations used in movies.

A Druids Pilgrimage – behind the scenes photographs taken by Ted Rokita and edited by Roland Keates. Harborough Rocks Derbyshire

Cinema continues to grow and attract more and more people. Films and documentaries that are produced each year which are no longer simply watched by the masses, but consumers want to trace the steps of the actors on the filming locations and even acquire derivatives of all kinds. This is commonly known as “film tourism”.

Film Tourism

Cinema or as also called the seventh art in France, is a sector that has evolved continuously under all points of view since the first film of the Brothers Lumières appeared in 1895.

A Druids Pilgrimage – behind the scenes photographs taken by Ted Rokita and edited by Roland Keates. Craig Ibbotson stills photographer and Roland Keates director

Today, cinema is ubiquitous in society and is accessible to everyone, thanks to various technological advances. Consumers around the world love to watch the latest movies at the cinema, rent and download them on their computer and put themselves in the shoes of characters for a few hours.

Cinema Today

Today cinema is no longer enough for itself: fans of these films want to go beyond being mere spectators, they want to relive the most beautiful scenes. It is thus that many tourist products derived from the cinema such as amusement parks, cruises or themed hotels were created to meet this demand linked to a great fascination for the seventh art.

A Druids Pilgrimage – behind the scenes photographs taken by Ted Rokita and edited by Roland Keates. Derbyshire high up

Thousands of international films are produced each year. So we can reasonably say that competition is getting tougher. Nowadays it isn’t the known stars which sell movies but the setting, or the environment in which the film is shot. Thus, it is necessarily influenced by the very activity of the particular shoot, thus creating a regional brand.

A Druids Pilgrimage – behind the scenes photographs taken by Ted Rokita and edited by Roland Keates. Crew waiting around

Besides, broadcasting images of Derbyshire on a large screen allows the county to reach a broad audience from all walks of life. Cinema is considered one of the most effective sources of communication to reach consumers. Indeed, moviegoers can hardly divert their attention. It creates strong emotions by its nature and reaches an international clientele.

Sigmund Freud

According to Sigmund Freud, being in a cinema theatre changes behaviour and the psychic state of the spectators. Tourist destinations can then grab the opportunity to market their products and seize the communication potential of this promotional tool.

A Druids Pilgrimage – behind the scenes photographs taken by Craig Ibbotson and edited by Roland Keates.

Visual media continues to progress from every point of view, allowing a sector such as cinema to be accessible anytime, anywhere and for anyone. The seventh art has always had a specific impact on the consumer by soliciting their emotions, giving them the impression that they live in the skin of the hero themselves.

Identifying characters

By identifying with characters, consumers do not just watch the movie: they want to relive the story of their favourite heroes and acquire derivative products to recreate this fictional world at home. With this in mind, I do hope consumers will read further about Druidry and visit the Derbyshire heritage and natural beauty sites.

This article was proofread by Laila Khan, proofreader http://www.transfigurephotography.co.uk/laila-khan-proofreader/

Roland_Keates

View all posts

Donate to Lost Histories





Advertisement

Film Awards